Did Albert Einstein Steal The Theory Of Relativity From His Wife?

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#TheoryOfRelativity #AlbertEinsteinDid Albert Einstein Steal The Theory Of Relativity From His Wife? : Did Albert Einstein steal the work on relativity from his wife? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights.

Answer by Paul Mainwood, Doctorate in Philosophy of Physics, on Quora:

It is an extraordinary claim, and as such, requires evidence. Einstein scholars (notably John Stachel and Robert Schulmann) have spent a lot of time and effort clarifying the sources of the allegation which as far as I can see, boils down to two claims:

It is an extraordinary claim, and as such, requires evidence. Einstein scholars (notably John Stachel and Robert Schulmann) have spent a lot of time and effort clarifying the sources of the allegation which as far as I can see, boils down to two claims:

  • That Abram Fedorovich Joffe, a member of the Soviet academy of Sciences and an assistant to Röntgen from 1902 until 1906, saw the original manuscript of the relativity paper, Zur Elektrodynamik bewegter Korper, and that this manuscript was signed “Einstein-Marity.” And “Marity” is a Hungarian variant of the Serbian “Marić,” Mileva’s maiden name. So, the claim goes, Mileva Marić Einstein’s name was on the original manuscript, but was then left out of the published article, where Albert Einstein’s name appears alone.
  • That on March 27, 1901 Einstein wrote a letter to Marić that included the clause “… bringing our work on relative motion to a successful conclusion.” Note the “our,” which implies that the work was done in collaboration.

The trouble with the first claim is that it is simply not true. This story seems to have come from Dr. Trbuhović-Gjurić, who claims that Joffe saw the manuscript of the 1905 relativity paper before it was published, and that it had both Einstein’s and Marić’s names on it.

But Dr. Trbuhović-Gjurić has been interviewed (by Schulmann) and asked for her evidence for this claim. She cited the published memoirs of Joffe as her source. This is fascinating, for Joffe’s memoirs are publicly available, so we can check them out directly.