10 ghost ships with truly strange stories

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#Ghost #Ships – 10 ghost ships with truly strange stories : When a ship and its crew set sail, it’s expected that they’ll all return to land together. Yet there have been a string of bizarre cases where ghost ships were found drifting at sea often without any sign of human life on board.

In many instances, everything on the ship appears to be in order. The only thing amiss is the fact that the crew has vanished. What happened? Where did everyone go? Was there an emergency causing the passengers to evacuate?

If that were the case, wouldn’t the ship have sunk? Let’s look at 10 of the most mysterious instances of ghost ships throughout history.

Carroll A. Deering

The Carroll A. Deering at its launch, before it was found run aground without its crew

The Carroll A. Deering at its launch, before it was found run aground without its crew

The Carroll A. Deering was found run aground off Cape Haterras, NC, in 1921 – with all its crew missing. The vessel had been headed for Virginia after delivering coal to Brazil. Not long before it was found abandoned, the crew had stopped in Barbados where first mate Charles B McLellan was arrested after making drunken threats against the newly appointed captain, WB Wormell.

However, Wormell forgave him and McLellan was released allowing the ship to set sail again. The Deering was later spotted near North Carolina’s Cape Cod Lightship when someone, assumed to be one of the ten crew members, let the lightship’s keeper know that the vessel had lost one of its anchors.

The Deering continued towards Virginia but the next time it was seen was when it was found abandoned on shoals near Cape Haterras – a ghost ship if ever there was one. All the crew’s belongings had gone, along with the lifeboats.

Some claim the vessel had fallen victim to the notorious Bermuda Triangle – where many ships and airplanes have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. Others claim the evidence points to a mutiny on board. The crew were never seen again…

Teignmouth Electron

Donald Crowhurst on the Teignmouth Electron before it was kitted out for his round-the-world attempt

Donald Crowhurst on the Teignmouth Electron before it was kitted out for his round-the-world attempt

This sailboat hit the high seas in 1968 with British businessman Donald Crowhurst at the helm, as he attempted to win the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race – the first ever solo round-the-world yacht race.

Before setting sail it’s thought Crowhurst had wanted to pull out due to doubts over the ship’s readiness. But he had ill-advisedly mortgaged both his failing nautical equipment business and his family home against financial support for the race – so felt compelled to take part.

He experienced difficulties with his makeshift vessel in the days leading up to and shortly after the start of the race, and soon realised the vessel would never make it. He then pulled over off the coast of South America, and began falsifying his records – making up chart positions for where he would be if he had carried on.

His intention was to reenter the race after all the other boats had gone all the way around the world, and take first place. It didn’t go quite as planned and it’s thought he later found out that someone else had won. In mid 1969, his ship was found drifting in the Atlantic Ocean without Crowhurst aboard.

He is thought to have gone insane under the mental pressure of what he had done, and thrown himself overboard. His diaries, recounting his bid to cheat in the race and subsequent demise, were found in the cabin. A documentary about his case, called Deep Water, was released in 2006 and makes fascinating viewing.